mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal
Zoom Info
mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal
Zoom Info
mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal
Zoom Info
mysticplaces:


Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.
It was impossible.
"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus
photography by Guy Tal
Zoom Info

mysticplaces:

Between the cleft and the lip of the caldera, the whole side of the volcano was carpeted in flowers.  Even in the moonlight he could distinguish those bright colors- violets and blues, dark greens and lavender, bright reds and violent oranges.  He stared, uncomprehending.

It was impossible.

"They’re called ephemerals," Anna said, speaking into that perfect silence. "Their seeds- hundreds of thousands of tiny seeds- lay in the dry earth for years.  And then, when finally the rains come, they blossom.  For a single day- for one single night- they bloom. "

-Atrus and Anna, The Book of Atrus

photography by Guy Tal

weightwatcherqueen:

Terrific Tip: Flip the bell peppers over to check their gender. The ones with four bumps are female and those with three bumps are male. The female peppers are full of seeds, but sweeter and better for eating raw and the males are better for cooking. Isn’t that cool? Saw this somewhere on Pinterest & thought my Tumblr followers would find it interesting! It looks like it’s origionally from produceplanet.blogspot.com. I told my Weight Watchers group about this & they thought it was super helpful! :-)

Oh my god… bad science. Bell peppers DO NOT have a gender. If you bothered to learn much about biology you would know that. The little bumps on the bottom ain’t gonna help you much with anything.

weightwatcherqueen:

Terrific Tip: Flip the bell peppers over to check their gender. The ones with four bumps are female and those with three bumps are male. The female peppers are full of seeds, but sweeter and better for eating raw and the males are better for cooking. Isn’t that cool? 

Saw this somewhere on Pinterest & thought my Tumblr followers would find it interesting! It looks like it’s origionally from produceplanet.blogspot.com. I told my Weight Watchers group about this & they thought it was super helpful! :-)

Oh my god… bad science. Bell peppers DO NOT have a gender. If you bothered to learn much about biology you would know that. The little bumps on the bottom ain’t gonna help you much with anything.

gregorygalloway:

On 25 August 1932, Amelia Earhart landed in Newark, NJ after completing her flight from Los Angeles, becoming the first woman to fly solo, nonstop, coast-to-coast. The flight took 19 hours and 5 minutes.

One of the most inspiring people that I’ve ever heard of.

gregorygalloway:

On 25 August 1932, Amelia Earhart landed in Newark, NJ after completing her flight from Los Angeles, becoming the first woman to fly solo, nonstop, coast-to-coast. The flight took 19 hours and 5 minutes.

One of the most inspiring people that I’ve ever heard of.

badrapper:

awwww-cute:

Went kayaking with my girlfriend and we made the cutest friend!

excuse me WHY are his hands up i cant handle this


Everyone thinks this is cute but that’s because they’ve never had their kayak tipped over by an aggressive one. The only reason why they do this is because they’ve been fed by retarded people in the past, not because DEY LIEK PEEPLE. Don’t feed wildlife guys. Even if it’s “cute”.

badrapper:

awwww-cute:

Went kayaking with my girlfriend and we made the cutest friend!

excuse me WHY are his hands up i cant handle this

Everyone thinks this is cute but that’s because they’ve never had their kayak tipped over by an aggressive one. The only reason why they do this is because they’ve been fed by retarded people in the past, not because DEY LIEK PEEPLE. Don’t feed wildlife guys. Even if it’s “cute”.

(via je-suis-les-etoiles)

thefirstwaltz:


HSH Princess Louise Alexandra Marie Irene of Battenberg (13 Jul 1889 Jugenheim, Germany - 7 Mar 1965 Stockholm, Sweden) 

Princess Louise and her sister, Princess Alice, were educated privately for most of their life, except for a brief period. 
Princess Louise was active during World War I; she participated in the Soldiers and Sailors Family Association, the Smoke for Soliders and Sailors and then enlisted in the Red Cross as a nurse. (Fjellman) 
For her hard work she was award two British awards - the British War and Victory Medals. She was also awarded a medal from the British Red Cross as well as a French medal. (Fjellman) 
When the war ended, Princess Louise continued her social work (now Lady Louise Mountbatten since 1917) in Battersea helping the children there. 
Louise received a proposal from King Manuel II of Portugal in 1909 that she refused, despite the support of King Edward VII. She insisted on marrying for love. (Fjellman) 
When she turned twenty, she became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark but the engagement was ended due to lack of funds. (Fjellman) 
Louise was unlucky in love really - she fell in love with a man who her parents approved of, however he was killed during the war. Then she fell in love with a man who her father assured her was homosexual, and so another engagement failed (Hugo Vickers, “Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece”, p. 127-130). 
Finally in 1923, the tables turned for Louise’s love life. She was courted by the three-years widowed Crown Prince of Sweden (her mother’s cousins husband before her death) (Fjellman).
On November 3rd of that year, Louise married the Crown Prince at St James’s Palace in the presence of members of both the royal families of Britain and Sweden. (Theo Aronson, Grandmama of Europe: the crowned descendants of Queen Victoria, part 352) 
Fjellman describes the marriage as very happy, and it was considered a marriage for love rather than status or money. As Queen Victoria of Sweden spent most of her time in Italy, Louise was thrown into the “role” of Queen quite quickly, taking on many of her duties. The Queen’s early death before her husband made Louise the first lady of Sweden very quickly after this, and as such Louise took on all of the Queen’s roles. (Fjellman) 

"It is hard for me to be the protector of different institutions, as I have been accustomed to practical work, as an ordinary person, before my marriage" - Crown Princess Louise of Sweden 

Louise had only one stillborn daughter on May 30th, 1925. 
Louise was a champion of nurses, gender equality and women’s rights. 

"Women are completely intellectually equal to men and, provided they are given sufficient education, are just as capable to deserve respect and admiration as men in this field"

In 1936, Louise was present at the funeral of King George V of the UK. 
When World War II came around, Louise was once again active with the Red Cross. She collected lighting and other tidbits like socks for the campaigns and soldiers guarding the neutral border of her country. As Sweden was neutral, Louise also acted as a messenger for those who could not communicate directly as a result of the war. She helped private citizens such as Princess Tatiana of Russia by providing supplies to her for her survival and well-being, and she helped many other people make it through the war. (Fjellman) 
In 1950, Louise became HRH Queen Louise of Sweden. 

"People look at me as if though I were something special. Surely I do not look differently today from how I looked yesterday!"

Her democratic mind abolished many of the old customs of the Swedish court. She also renovated the palace in Stockholm. 
She was described as easy to anger and temperamental, as well as eccentric for royalty. However, she was said to have had a good heart, a good sense of humour and a sense of self irony for her royal role. She was seen as honest as well, always expressing her feelings openly. (Fjellman) 

 "I would describe the queen as a gentleman. She would never avoid acknowledging her own mistakes" - Said at court 

Queen Louise was very proud of the nation she married into, and boasted about the political system to her relatives. She also greatly admired the culture and Swedish women and the way they presented themselves and their ideals. (Fjellman) 
Queen Louise had several pomeranian dogs, which often caused trouble for her when she was travelling and going through customs. 
The Queen was a frequent jay-walker, and it said that while in England she carried a card with her that said “I am the Queen of Sweden” so that people would know if she was hit by a car. (Fjellman) 
In 1964 she attended the Nobel Prize ceremony, which was her last official engagement as Queen and last public appearance. 
On March 7th, 1965, the Queen passed away after a period of extreme illness which had begun in 1964. She died at a hospital in Stockholm and is buried with her husband in the Royal Cemetery in Solna, Sweden. 
Zoom Info
thefirstwaltz:


HSH Princess Louise Alexandra Marie Irene of Battenberg (13 Jul 1889 Jugenheim, Germany - 7 Mar 1965 Stockholm, Sweden) 

Princess Louise and her sister, Princess Alice, were educated privately for most of their life, except for a brief period. 
Princess Louise was active during World War I; she participated in the Soldiers and Sailors Family Association, the Smoke for Soliders and Sailors and then enlisted in the Red Cross as a nurse. (Fjellman) 
For her hard work she was award two British awards - the British War and Victory Medals. She was also awarded a medal from the British Red Cross as well as a French medal. (Fjellman) 
When the war ended, Princess Louise continued her social work (now Lady Louise Mountbatten since 1917) in Battersea helping the children there. 
Louise received a proposal from King Manuel II of Portugal in 1909 that she refused, despite the support of King Edward VII. She insisted on marrying for love. (Fjellman) 
When she turned twenty, she became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark but the engagement was ended due to lack of funds. (Fjellman) 
Louise was unlucky in love really - she fell in love with a man who her parents approved of, however he was killed during the war. Then she fell in love with a man who her father assured her was homosexual, and so another engagement failed (Hugo Vickers, “Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece”, p. 127-130). 
Finally in 1923, the tables turned for Louise’s love life. She was courted by the three-years widowed Crown Prince of Sweden (her mother’s cousins husband before her death) (Fjellman).
On November 3rd of that year, Louise married the Crown Prince at St James’s Palace in the presence of members of both the royal families of Britain and Sweden. (Theo Aronson, Grandmama of Europe: the crowned descendants of Queen Victoria, part 352) 
Fjellman describes the marriage as very happy, and it was considered a marriage for love rather than status or money. As Queen Victoria of Sweden spent most of her time in Italy, Louise was thrown into the “role” of Queen quite quickly, taking on many of her duties. The Queen’s early death before her husband made Louise the first lady of Sweden very quickly after this, and as such Louise took on all of the Queen’s roles. (Fjellman) 

"It is hard for me to be the protector of different institutions, as I have been accustomed to practical work, as an ordinary person, before my marriage" - Crown Princess Louise of Sweden 

Louise had only one stillborn daughter on May 30th, 1925. 
Louise was a champion of nurses, gender equality and women’s rights. 

"Women are completely intellectually equal to men and, provided they are given sufficient education, are just as capable to deserve respect and admiration as men in this field"

In 1936, Louise was present at the funeral of King George V of the UK. 
When World War II came around, Louise was once again active with the Red Cross. She collected lighting and other tidbits like socks for the campaigns and soldiers guarding the neutral border of her country. As Sweden was neutral, Louise also acted as a messenger for those who could not communicate directly as a result of the war. She helped private citizens such as Princess Tatiana of Russia by providing supplies to her for her survival and well-being, and she helped many other people make it through the war. (Fjellman) 
In 1950, Louise became HRH Queen Louise of Sweden. 

"People look at me as if though I were something special. Surely I do not look differently today from how I looked yesterday!"

Her democratic mind abolished many of the old customs of the Swedish court. She also renovated the palace in Stockholm. 
She was described as easy to anger and temperamental, as well as eccentric for royalty. However, she was said to have had a good heart, a good sense of humour and a sense of self irony for her royal role. She was seen as honest as well, always expressing her feelings openly. (Fjellman) 

 "I would describe the queen as a gentleman. She would never avoid acknowledging her own mistakes" - Said at court 

Queen Louise was very proud of the nation she married into, and boasted about the political system to her relatives. She also greatly admired the culture and Swedish women and the way they presented themselves and their ideals. (Fjellman) 
Queen Louise had several pomeranian dogs, which often caused trouble for her when she was travelling and going through customs. 
The Queen was a frequent jay-walker, and it said that while in England she carried a card with her that said “I am the Queen of Sweden” so that people would know if she was hit by a car. (Fjellman) 
In 1964 she attended the Nobel Prize ceremony, which was her last official engagement as Queen and last public appearance. 
On March 7th, 1965, the Queen passed away after a period of extreme illness which had begun in 1964. She died at a hospital in Stockholm and is buried with her husband in the Royal Cemetery in Solna, Sweden. 
Zoom Info
thefirstwaltz:


HSH Princess Louise Alexandra Marie Irene of Battenberg (13 Jul 1889 Jugenheim, Germany - 7 Mar 1965 Stockholm, Sweden) 

Princess Louise and her sister, Princess Alice, were educated privately for most of their life, except for a brief period. 
Princess Louise was active during World War I; she participated in the Soldiers and Sailors Family Association, the Smoke for Soliders and Sailors and then enlisted in the Red Cross as a nurse. (Fjellman) 
For her hard work she was award two British awards - the British War and Victory Medals. She was also awarded a medal from the British Red Cross as well as a French medal. (Fjellman) 
When the war ended, Princess Louise continued her social work (now Lady Louise Mountbatten since 1917) in Battersea helping the children there. 
Louise received a proposal from King Manuel II of Portugal in 1909 that she refused, despite the support of King Edward VII. She insisted on marrying for love. (Fjellman) 
When she turned twenty, she became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark but the engagement was ended due to lack of funds. (Fjellman) 
Louise was unlucky in love really - she fell in love with a man who her parents approved of, however he was killed during the war. Then she fell in love with a man who her father assured her was homosexual, and so another engagement failed (Hugo Vickers, “Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece”, p. 127-130). 
Finally in 1923, the tables turned for Louise’s love life. She was courted by the three-years widowed Crown Prince of Sweden (her mother’s cousins husband before her death) (Fjellman).
On November 3rd of that year, Louise married the Crown Prince at St James’s Palace in the presence of members of both the royal families of Britain and Sweden. (Theo Aronson, Grandmama of Europe: the crowned descendants of Queen Victoria, part 352) 
Fjellman describes the marriage as very happy, and it was considered a marriage for love rather than status or money. As Queen Victoria of Sweden spent most of her time in Italy, Louise was thrown into the “role” of Queen quite quickly, taking on many of her duties. The Queen’s early death before her husband made Louise the first lady of Sweden very quickly after this, and as such Louise took on all of the Queen’s roles. (Fjellman) 

"It is hard for me to be the protector of different institutions, as I have been accustomed to practical work, as an ordinary person, before my marriage" - Crown Princess Louise of Sweden 

Louise had only one stillborn daughter on May 30th, 1925. 
Louise was a champion of nurses, gender equality and women’s rights. 

"Women are completely intellectually equal to men and, provided they are given sufficient education, are just as capable to deserve respect and admiration as men in this field"

In 1936, Louise was present at the funeral of King George V of the UK. 
When World War II came around, Louise was once again active with the Red Cross. She collected lighting and other tidbits like socks for the campaigns and soldiers guarding the neutral border of her country. As Sweden was neutral, Louise also acted as a messenger for those who could not communicate directly as a result of the war. She helped private citizens such as Princess Tatiana of Russia by providing supplies to her for her survival and well-being, and she helped many other people make it through the war. (Fjellman) 
In 1950, Louise became HRH Queen Louise of Sweden. 

"People look at me as if though I were something special. Surely I do not look differently today from how I looked yesterday!"

Her democratic mind abolished many of the old customs of the Swedish court. She also renovated the palace in Stockholm. 
She was described as easy to anger and temperamental, as well as eccentric for royalty. However, she was said to have had a good heart, a good sense of humour and a sense of self irony for her royal role. She was seen as honest as well, always expressing her feelings openly. (Fjellman) 

 "I would describe the queen as a gentleman. She would never avoid acknowledging her own mistakes" - Said at court 

Queen Louise was very proud of the nation she married into, and boasted about the political system to her relatives. She also greatly admired the culture and Swedish women and the way they presented themselves and their ideals. (Fjellman) 
Queen Louise had several pomeranian dogs, which often caused trouble for her when she was travelling and going through customs. 
The Queen was a frequent jay-walker, and it said that while in England she carried a card with her that said “I am the Queen of Sweden” so that people would know if she was hit by a car. (Fjellman) 
In 1964 she attended the Nobel Prize ceremony, which was her last official engagement as Queen and last public appearance. 
On March 7th, 1965, the Queen passed away after a period of extreme illness which had begun in 1964. She died at a hospital in Stockholm and is buried with her husband in the Royal Cemetery in Solna, Sweden. 
Zoom Info

thefirstwaltz:

HSH Princess Louise Alexandra Marie Irene of Battenberg (13 Jul 1889 Jugenheim, Germany - 7 Mar 1965 Stockholm, Sweden) 

Princess Louise and her sister, Princess Alice, were educated privately for most of their life, except for a brief period. 

Princess Louise was active during World War I; she participated in the Soldiers and Sailors Family Association, the Smoke for Soliders and Sailors and then enlisted in the Red Cross as a nurse. (Fjellman) 

For her hard work she was award two British awards - the British War and Victory Medals. She was also awarded a medal from the British Red Cross as well as a French medal. (Fjellman) 

When the war ended, Princess Louise continued her social work (now Lady Louise Mountbatten since 1917) in Battersea helping the children there. 

Louise received a proposal from King Manuel II of Portugal in 1909 that she refused, despite the support of King Edward VII. She insisted on marrying for love. (Fjellman) 

When she turned twenty, she became secretly engaged to Prince Christopher of Greece and Denmark but the engagement was ended due to lack of funds. (Fjellman) 

Louise was unlucky in love really - she fell in love with a man who her parents approved of, however he was killed during the war. Then she fell in love with a man who her father assured her was homosexual, and so another engagement failed (Hugo Vickers, “Alice, Princess Andrew of Greece”, p. 127-130). 

Finally in 1923, the tables turned for Louise’s love life. She was courted by the three-years widowed Crown Prince of Sweden (her mother’s cousins husband before her death) (Fjellman).

On November 3rd of that year, Louise married the Crown Prince at St James’s Palace in the presence of members of both the royal families of Britain and Sweden. (Theo Aronson, Grandmama of Europe: the crowned descendants of Queen Victoria, part 352) 

Fjellman describes the marriage as very happy, and it was considered a marriage for love rather than status or money. As Queen Victoria of Sweden spent most of her time in Italy, Louise was thrown into the “role” of Queen quite quickly, taking on many of her duties. The Queen’s early death before her husband made Louise the first lady of Sweden very quickly after this, and as such Louise took on all of the Queen’s roles. (Fjellman) 

"It is hard for me to be the protector of different institutions, as I have been accustomed to practical work, as an ordinary person, before my marriage" - Crown Princess Louise of Sweden 

Louise had only one stillborn daughter on May 30th, 1925. 

Louise was a champion of nurses, gender equality and women’s rights. 

"Women are completely intellectually equal to men and, provided they are given sufficient education, are just as capable to deserve respect and admiration as men in this field"

In 1936, Louise was present at the funeral of King George V of the UK. 

When World War II came around, Louise was once again active with the Red Cross. She collected lighting and other tidbits like socks for the campaigns and soldiers guarding the neutral border of her country. As Sweden was neutral, Louise also acted as a messenger for those who could not communicate directly as a result of the war. She helped private citizens such as Princess Tatiana of Russia by providing supplies to her for her survival and well-being, and she helped many other people make it through the war. (Fjellman) 

In 1950, Louise became HRH Queen Louise of Sweden. 

"People look at me as if though I were something special. Surely I do not look differently today from how I looked yesterday!"

Her democratic mind abolished many of the old customs of the Swedish court. She also renovated the palace in Stockholm. 

She was described as easy to anger and temperamental, as well as eccentric for royalty. However, she was said to have had a good heart, a good sense of humour and a sense of self irony for her royal role. She was seen as honest as well, always expressing her feelings openly. (Fjellman) 

 "I would describe the queen as a gentleman. She would never avoid acknowledging her own mistakes" - Said at court 

Queen Louise was very proud of the nation she married into, and boasted about the political system to her relatives. She also greatly admired the culture and Swedish women and the way they presented themselves and their ideals. (Fjellman) 

Queen Louise had several pomeranian dogs, which often caused trouble for her when she was travelling and going through customs. 

The Queen was a frequent jay-walker, and it said that while in England she carried a card with her that said “I am the Queen of Sweden” so that people would know if she was hit by a car. (Fjellman) 

In 1964 she attended the Nobel Prize ceremony, which was her last official engagement as Queen and last public appearance. 

On March 7th, 1965, the Queen passed away after a period of extreme illness which had begun in 1964. She died at a hospital in Stockholm and is buried with her husband in the Royal Cemetery in Solna, Sweden. 

Everyone should learn self defence.

cielrougelesoir:

If you cannot afford classes, watch a YouTube video even on how to throw a punch properly. Don’t throw your hands up in the air and say, “well, maybe people shouldn’t put me in danger!” If you’re thinking that, then you don’t understand people. Don’t leave yourself vulnerable.